Department

Criminal Justice

Mentor

Dr. Tamara J. Lynn

Description

Interpersonal violence is an issue facing all college campuses, including those in Kansas. Some studies indicate that more than a quarter of surveyed college students admit to having perpetrated actions construed as sexually violent in nature. Title IX of the Education Amendments Act requires schools to respond to issues of sexual violence. This approach, while important, reacts to incidents that have already occurred rather than preventing violence. One possible reason for the rampant existence of sexual violence on campuses is that many behaviors are not identified as violent, even by those on the receiving end. This study presents findings from a survey designed to measure undergraduate perceptions of interpersonal violence. Students attending a 4-year liberal arts institution viewed a series of videos depicting behaviors within the context of relationships. Using a fivepoint Likert scale, students indicated whether scenes demonstrated interpersonal violence. The research analyzed results associated with gender, race, ethnicity, and whether the student or someone they know has experienced interpersonal violence. Results suggest that undergraduates who have previously been victims or know a victim of interpersonal violence, and have attended an educational session to learn the warning signs of violence, are more apt to recognize patterns of abuse. Other students are less apt to identify behaviors such as isolation, control, and coercion as interpersonal violence. Findings confirm that education is effective for helping students recognize interpersonal violence. Expanding educational resources will aid college administrators in being pro-active to reduce Title IX issues.

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Undergraduate Perceptions ofinterpersonal Violence

Interpersonal violence is an issue facing all college campuses, including those in Kansas. Some studies indicate that more than a quarter of surveyed college students admit to having perpetrated actions construed as sexually violent in nature. Title IX of the Education Amendments Act requires schools to respond to issues of sexual violence. This approach, while important, reacts to incidents that have already occurred rather than preventing violence. One possible reason for the rampant existence of sexual violence on campuses is that many behaviors are not identified as violent, even by those on the receiving end. This study presents findings from a survey designed to measure undergraduate perceptions of interpersonal violence. Students attending a 4-year liberal arts institution viewed a series of videos depicting behaviors within the context of relationships. Using a fivepoint Likert scale, students indicated whether scenes demonstrated interpersonal violence. The research analyzed results associated with gender, race, ethnicity, and whether the student or someone they know has experienced interpersonal violence. Results suggest that undergraduates who have previously been victims or know a victim of interpersonal violence, and have attended an educational session to learn the warning signs of violence, are more apt to recognize patterns of abuse. Other students are less apt to identify behaviors such as isolation, control, and coercion as interpersonal violence. Findings confirm that education is effective for helping students recognize interpersonal violence. Expanding educational resources will aid college administrators in being pro-active to reduce Title IX issues.