Department

Agriculture

Mentor

Dr. Robert Keener

Description

This study was developed to provide nutritional advice to young swine producers who are purchasing and growing young show pigs. The objective of this study was to compare the rate of gain and associated economic cost per pound of gain relative to different show pig rations. Information gained from this study could provide an educated decision making tool enabling young producers to be economically viable in the swine industry. The trial was divided into four groups containing seven mixed breed pigs of similar weight. All of the pigs within the trial were within eight days of age. Three groups were fed specific show pig rations, with a control group being fed a balanced com and soybean meal ration. All four rations throughout the trial were fed ad libitum for thirteen weeks. Each week, the pigs were individually identified, weighed, and collected weight data were recorded. Research results revealed differing rates of gain between groups varying between 1.93 and 2.48 pounds/day with the control group averaging 2.33. The control ration was the most economical feed, nearly four times more cost effective with only a 6% decrease in average daily gain compared to the highest gaining ration. It was concluded that expensive rations do not always provide an above average rate of gain but may incur a higher cost per pound of gain. From this study, young producers can make informed decisions toward purchasing nutritionally efficient and economical rations.

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Pig Growth and Development Based on Differing Swine Rations

This study was developed to provide nutritional advice to young swine producers who are purchasing and growing young show pigs. The objective of this study was to compare the rate of gain and associated economic cost per pound of gain relative to different show pig rations. Information gained from this study could provide an educated decision making tool enabling young producers to be economically viable in the swine industry. The trial was divided into four groups containing seven mixed breed pigs of similar weight. All of the pigs within the trial were within eight days of age. Three groups were fed specific show pig rations, with a control group being fed a balanced com and soybean meal ration. All four rations throughout the trial were fed ad libitum for thirteen weeks. Each week, the pigs were individually identified, weighed, and collected weight data were recorded. Research results revealed differing rates of gain between groups varying between 1.93 and 2.48 pounds/day with the control group averaging 2.33. The control ration was the most economical feed, nearly four times more cost effective with only a 6% decrease in average daily gain compared to the highest gaining ration. It was concluded that expensive rations do not always provide an above average rate of gain but may incur a higher cost per pound of gain. From this study, young producers can make informed decisions toward purchasing nutritionally efficient and economical rations.