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Abstract

This article models the influence of students’ generalized self-efficacy, faculty expectations, and institutional climate on students’ academic self-efficacy beliefs and outcome expectations conductive to academic achievement in undergraduate business education. Theoretical foundations were drawn from psychological contract and social cognitive theories. Results indicated that several sources of expectations exist: individual or self, faculty, and educational institution. Generalized self-efficacy and faculty expectations influence students’ academic self-efficacy while institutional climate only effects outcome expectations beliefs. Academic self-efficacy is a stronger predictor of academic achievement climate outcomes expectations alone. Psychological contracts must nurture student's self-efficacy, explicit faculty expectations as motivational drivers, and align institutional climates to build students' trust. I discuss the implications of these results for educational models, academic performance, and student retention in business schools.

Volume

3

Issue

1

First Page

1

Last Page

13

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